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Poetry as Consciousness
Haiku Forests, Space of Mind, and an Ethics of Freedom

Poetry as Consciousness 書影
Image of the book(Click to enlarge)

Author: Richard Gilbert
Illustrator: Sabine Miller
A5 Hardcover 304 pages
Price:3000JPY+Tax
Publication date: February 28, 2018 ISBN978-4-86330-189-4

Cognitive process itself is a kind of poetry

Overview
   This work views contemporary poetry (with illustrative examples drawn from haiku) through the lens of cognitive and literary linguistics, and depth psychology, focusing on two areas: enactments of personal philosophy and creative freedom.
   The practice and inventiveness of poetry is investigated as a form of resistance, and as an expression of secrecy and privacy. Related discussions touch on the need for “quality time” as well as “quality place”—both need to be fought for, being that sanctuary as space of mind cannot easily be defined (let alone defended) as “productive.”
   Throughout the exposition, Sabine Miller’s visual art, created in collaboration with this writing, brings dimensions of poetic volition to life through her “floragrams”—florals and verdure of the plant kingdom.
(Summarized from the Introduction)

This work has been supported by The Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research Kakenhi 15K02755 (2015-2018). Book publication has been supported by a Kumamoto University Academic Publication Subsidy.

Author

Richard Gilbert
Richard Gilbert is a tenured Professor of American Literature at the Graduate School of Social and Cultural Sciences, Kumamoto University. In the 1980s, he studied with Beat poets Allen Ginsberg, Gary Snyder, and others at Naropa University (Boulder, Colorado). After receiving an MA in Contemplative Psychology he worked as an clinical outpatient psychotherapist; he received his Ph.D. in Poetics and Depth Psychology in 1990, studying Archetypal Psychology with James Hillman at The Union Institute & University. His book, Poems of Consciousness: Contemporary Japanese & English-language Haiku in Cross-cultural Perspective (2008), was awarded the HSA 2009 Mildred Kanterman Award for Haiku Criticism and Theory. In August 2013, The Disjunctive Dragonfly: A New Theory of English-language Haiku was awarded the Touchstone Prize in criticism. In 2017, he co‑authored Earth in Sunrise: A Course for English-Language Haiku Study.

Illustrator

Sabine Miller
Sabine Miller started using flowers as paint/brushes in the wilds of Lagnitas, California in the late nineties. Her latest poetry publication is "Branch to Finch"(Ornithopter Press, 2016).

Table of Contents

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

INTRODUCTION
Poetry and the Beauty of Distance
A Personal Journey
Overview: Poetry, Sanctuary and the Space of Mind

I. SPACE OF MIND
The Perception of the Unique
Immeasurability
Sunny-side Up in Space
Soul
Space is the Place
The Specious Present: The Poetry-line & Haiku
Between Meaning and Unknowing
Architectures to Inspire Dwelling
Properties of Thoughtspace
Six Notions Concerning the Psycho-poetic Landscape of Thought
Seven Properties of Thoughtspace

II. PHILOPOETIC VOLITION
Volition: Enactments of Personal Philosophy
Remembrance and Distance

III. THE SHAPE OF JAZZ TO COME
A Memoir
Inhabitation
In Review: And Why Haiku?
Secrecy

IV. PRIVACY MATTERS
The Panopticon
Time Slips Away

V. SANCTUARY
Theatre of the Sacred
Sanctuary, Temenos and Risk
Beyond the Salon
Anarchic Sanctuaries, Collaborative Worlds
Q1. What for you is an anarchic sanctuary?
Q2. Would you provide some examples
Q3. How would entering a virtual social world
contrast with reading speculative fiction?
Q4. Experiencing group-creative social & virtual
collaboration, what are some benefits and contrasts?
Q5. Is somatic physicality (being present in physical
proximity) overrated as to social congress?
Q6. How do you imagine the future, in relation to a positive
sociality which values anarchic forms of sanctuary
?
Where We Have Never Been

VI. HAIKU, AN ETHICS OF FREEDOM
Remystification
Analysis: Conceptual Architectures of Thoughtspace
Outline: 36 Qualities of Thoughtspace Derived from 7 Properties
1) SPACE (Perception)
1. Minimal Creation
2. Novel Worlds
3. Immeasurability
4. Unknown Unknowns

2) LANGUAGE (Terminologies & Shared Communication)
5. Concreta vs Abstracta
6. Conceptual Blending
7. Neologism (Unusuality)
8. Possible Worlds
9. Inferred Narratives
10. Staging -- Theatres of Story

3) THOUGHTSPACE (Conditional Ephemerality)
11. Philopoetic Volition
12. Practice of Invention
13. Spatial Thermoclines
4) METAPHORICS (Deformational fictions; ‘to be as’)
14. Fantasy Imagery
15. Paradox
16. Alternativity
17. Idiosyncrasy (Fallacy)
18. Crafting of Presentation
19. Mimesis (“Shadow of the Divine”)

5) ARCHITECTURES (Design-intention)
20. Design-architecture
21. World building, Construction
22. Temenos
23. Precincts
24. Construction -- Sacred Construction
25. Notions of Anarchic Sanctuary

6) SOUL (Explorative Desire)
26. Soul (as Core Value)
27. Remembrance and Distance
28. Grit, Guts
29. Desire, Passion
31. With Risk

7) THE “THIRD” (“Hypothetical” Humanity)
32. Distance
33. Forms of Resistance
34. Inhabitation (Dwelling)
35. Place
36. Consciousness -- Revisions of World and Self

CONCLUSION
Permeability
Poetic Force and Imaginal Space at Liberty
An Ethics of Freedom

VII. APPENDIX 1. 36 QUALITIES OF THOUGHTSPACE
Verbose Description
1) SPACE
2) LANGUAGE
3) THOUGHTSPACE
4) METAPHORICS
5) ARCHITECTURES
6) SOUL
7) THE “THIRD


VIII. APPENDIX 2. DISJUNCTION IN HAIKU--STRONG AND WEAK
A New Definition
Disjunctive Modes
Haiku Exhibiting Strong Disjunction
Haiku Exhibiting Weak Disjunction
Critical Usefulness: Terminology
Living Haiku

IX. APPENDIX 3. FORETHOUGHT

X. ENDNOTES
XI. REFERENCES


Floragrams, by Sabine Miller

1. “Poet and Temenos,” 2016
2. “Space-egg,” 2017
3. “Immeasurable Intangible Unknown,” 2017
4. “Spatial Thermoclines,” 2017
5. “Roses for Ornette,” 2017
6. “Imagination is Unclaimed,” 2017
7. “Theatre of Dwelling,” 2016
8. "Anarchic Sanctuary," 2017
9. “Emily’s Darlings,” 2016
10. “Rose in Time,” 2016
11. “Contiguous Spaces,” 2017
12. “Thoughtcraft,” 2016
13. “Amnion,” 2017
14. “Surface and Depth,” 2017
15. “The Spectral City,” 2017
16. “Volitional Formations,” 2017

Words of recommendation (Blurb) 1
   Poetry as Consciousness will take the reader on a deep dive into the role that mind plays in the process of poetic creation. Richard Gilbert, one of the world’s leading theorists in English-language haiku, introduces the reader to a broad range of terms and concepts borrowed from such disciplines as archetypal psychology, cognitive linguistics, literary theory, neurophenomenology, philosophy, Buddhism, comparative religions, Roman and Greek mythology, as well as the ethical-technology design movement in order to broaden our understanding of the poetic process, which Gilbert describes as a “psycho-poetic landscape of thought,” a shared consciousness between poet and reader that also provides access to mythopoetic realities. After a careful reading of the challenging theoretical sections, the reader should be rewarded with a different perspective regarding why we find poetry so engaging. Gilbert then describes in detail this shared landscape of the poetic imagination as thoughtspace, a territory comprised of 7 properties and 36 qualities that he intriguingly illustrates with 216 haiku which also feature a disjunctive style. Something that should also appeal to readers is the interview-written data of poets whose words Gilbert uses to describe specific kinds of alternative communities, where, as authentic places for the poetic imagination, poets may dwell.
   Poetry as Consciousness invites the reader to consider the view that, through mythopoetic imagination, consciousness presents experiences of realities that enlarge who we are. To accomplish this, however, requires freedom in thoughtspace, indeed, as Gilbert argues, it is necessary to embrace “an ethics of freedom.” Poetry as Consciousness simply helps us better understand the visceral and transformative impact that poetry, and haiku in particular, has upon our lives.

Victor Ortiz, Ph.D., Department of World Languages, Marlborough School, Los Angeles

Words of recommendation (Blurb) 2
   We need poetry more than ever, if only to recognize ourselves. Richard Gilbert’s Poetry as Consciousness reminds us that indeed at a fundamental level we are poetry -- that the co-creative “poetic space of mind” is a primary and essential expression of our being-human in the world.
   Poetry as Consciousness is sublime, a compelling picture of poetry as the languaging of the creative substance and alchemy of mind and soul, as Gilbert also peers further through the veil to give vocabulary to the elusive haiku genre within the context of its role as a cognitive poetics. I believe we will continue to find how much we need this work and others in a like vein as we explore the new interior frontiers of the 21st Century.

Michelle Tennison, author of murmuration (2016)

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